Skip to content

Martha-Mary Chapel

January 26, 2015
Martha-Mary Chapel

Martha-Mary Chapel

Built From History

The Martha-Mary Chapel, located in Sudbury, Massachusetts, was built by boys from the Wayside Inn Boys’ School operated by Henry Ford on the Wayside Inn property. Wood for the building came from trees felled by the historic hurricane of 1938.

The structure is one of six non-denominational chapels built around the country as a tribute to Henry and Clara Ford’s mothers, Martha Bryant and Mary Litogot Ford.

The Chapel celebrated its first wedding in 1941. As you can see by both its architectural style and transitioning fall foliage background, it makes a perfect location for an intimate wedding ceremony.

One Part of The Historic Site

The Martha-Mary Chapel is one of four main buildings that make up the Wayside Inn Historic Site. Click here to view the map of the entire site. When visiting the Sudbury area, definitely add the Wayside Inn and all of its main buildings to your scenic travel list.

Photo Info:

Camera:  Nikon D300
Lens:  Nikkor 18-200mm
Exif Data:  1/1600s, f/5.6, ISO 200, 32mm

For Licensing Information or to Purchase A Print:  Email Me!

Come back every Monday to see my latest “Single Shot Showcase”!

~ Liz Mackney

Website
Blog
Facebook Page
Editor’s Pick Gallery
Fine Art Prints

Proud Member of the New England Photography Guild 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Crane Estate in Winter

January 12, 2015
Afternoon light and a bit of snow

Afternoon light and a touch of snow

A Perfect Time To Visit

Winter is a perfect time to visit the Crane Estate in Ipswich, Massachusetts. The quiet and solitude of a winter’s day is a time of transformation. Light and shadow play off the architecture and create patterns in the snow. Occasionally you might pass another visitor, and it’s not at all uncommon to see deer quietly making their way across the grounds.

Visual Perspective

What I liked about this perspective was how the stone wall in the foreground became the visual leading line to the corner of the enclosed garden. That in turn became the visual leading line to the Great House in the background. The late afternoon light filtering through the trees from right to left was just enough to highlight key areas of the estate throughout the depth of field.

Added Bonus

So if you’re traveling through Ipswich, Massachusetts, this winter, I highly recommend that you pay a visit to the Crane Estate. As an added bonus, Crane Beach is right next door.

Photo Info:

Camera:  Nikon D300
Lens:  Nikkor 18-200mm
Exif Data:  1/320s, f/7.1, ISO 200, 24mm, 3-image exposure, HDR Tonemapped

For Licensing Information or to Purchase A Print:  Email Me!

Come back every Monday to see my latest “Single Shot Showcase”!

~ Liz Mackney

Website
Blog
Facebook Page
Editor’s Pick Gallery
Fine Art Prints

Proud Member of the New England Photography Guild 

 

 

 

An Artistic Touch on Winnekenni Castle

January 5, 2015
Follow the garden pathway

Take a stroll down the garden path

A Welcoming Perspective

Although I showcased Winnekenni Castle last year, I thought this perspective of the castle would be equally appreciated. This image was photographed early October 2013 with autumn still to arrive.

As you can see by the potted plants creatively placed along the garden’s path — which quite nicely complemented the castle’s vibrant flower borders — summer was still providing quite a bit of color late in the season. Needless to say, I was quite delighted.

A Bit of An Artistic Touch

I chose to shoot from a low perspective to really draw the viewer’s eye down the garden path. To further showcase this historic treasure, I selectively applied both the Topaz Labs Simplify and Impression filters for a bit of an artistic touch during post production. Both were a natural fit for the image.

When visiting Haverhill, Massachusetts, make sure to check out Winnekenni Castle. It’s definitely worth a stop to explore, photograph, draw, or paint. Indulging one’s artistic side is always a good time.

Photo Info:

Camera:  Nikon D300
Lens:  Tokina 11-16mm
Exif Data:  1/200s, f/7.1, ISO 200, 14mm, 3-image exposure, HDR Tonemapped

For Licensing Information or to Purchase A Print:  Email Me!

Come back every Monday to see my latest “Single Shot Showcase”!

~ Liz Mackney

Website
Blog
Facebook Page
Editor’s Pick Gallery
Fine Art Prints

Proud Member of the New England Photography Guild 

 

 

 

Happy Holidays!

December 22, 2014
Wishing you and yours the blessings of the season.

Wishing you and yours all of the blessings of the holiday season.

Meriden Covered Bridge

August 18, 2014
Meriden Covered Bridge also known as Mill Covered Bridge

Meriden Covered Bridge in autumn

Third Time’s The Charm

The Meriden Covered Bridge, located on Colby Hill Road, spans the Blood Brook in the town of Plainfield, New Hampshire. Originally constructed in 1880 at a cost of $685, the current bridge is actually the third version to stand on this site.

Nature’s Fury

Also known as the Mill Bridge, the structure was severely damaged by Hurricane Carol in 1954. Steel beams were later introduced in 1963 when the bridge was rebuilt. New England weather itself can be brutal at times, as it was in the spring of 1977 when heavy snows caused the bridge’s roof to cave in. That damage was repaired at a cost of $8,296.

Preserving History

Covered bridges are treasured in New England, and this one is no exception. In 1985 the state of New Hampshire repaired the bridge’s decaying substructure at a cost of $57,000.

The Meriden Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Autumn Beauty

As you can see, autumn provides an idyllic setting for this bridge. Therefore, if you’re a covered bridge lover or a fall foliage fan, make sure to add the Meriden Covered Bridge to your list of New England scenic destinations. To capture the foliage, I would say early October might yield the best color. Click here to keep abreast of New England’s Fall Foliage forecast and current status.

 

Photo Info:

Camera:  Nikon D300
Lens:  Nikkor 18-200mm
Exif Data:  1/250s, f/5.0, ISO 200, 42mm

For Licensing Information or to Purchase A Print:  Email Me!

Come back every week to see my latest “Single Shot Showcase”!

~ Liz Mackney

Website
Blog
Facebook Page
Editor’s Pick Gallery
Fine Art Prints

Proud Member of the New England Photography Guild 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sphinx at Mount Auburn Cemetery

August 12, 2014
American Sphinx Monument at Mount Auburn Cemetery

A monumental tribute to an important part of history.

The Civil War Remembered

The Sphinx monument at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was commissioned by founder Jacob Bigelow and created by sculptor Martin Milmore in 1872. Its historical significance to the causes and victory of the Civil War is clearly summarized in the monument’s inscription:

“American Union Preserved
African Slavery Destroyed
By the Uprising of a Great People
by the Blood of Fallen Heroes.”

More of The History

As quoted from the Mount Auburn Cemetery website:

“In December 1871, a single block of granite from Hallowell, Maine, was reduced to approximately 40 tons and conveyed by railroad to Boston. The owner of the quarry admitted to never having moved a stone this heavy. Milmore created a plaster model for the Sphinx in his studio on Tremont Street in Boston. He then transported the model by horse and carriage to the marble yard of the McDonald Monument Company across from the Cemetery on Mount Auburn Street. There, he and his brother Joseph carved the great statue. They completed the Sphinx in July 1872, and in August it was moved into the Cemetery.”

One of Many

The Sphinx is one of many notable structures that can be found in Mount Auburn Cemetery. Whether in early spring with the daffodils in bloom, or during the changing colors of autumn, a stroll through Mount Auburn Cemetery is always a fascinating adventure.

Photo Info:

Camera:  Nikon D300
Lens:  Nikkor 18-200mm
Exif Data:  1/640s, f/5.6, ISO 200, 18mm, –1/3 EV

For Licensing Information or to Purchase A Print:  Email Me!

Come back every week to see my latest “Single Shot Showcase”!

~ Liz Mackney

Website
Blog
Facebook Page
Editor’s Pick Gallery
Fine Art Prints

Proud Member of the New England Photography Guild 

 

 

 

 

 

Scituate Light

July 23, 2014
Scituate Lighthouse from across Scituate Harbor

As viewed from across Scituate Harbor

A Little Background Info…

Old Scituate Light is a historic lighthouse located on Cedar Point in Scituate, Massachusetts. Built in 1811, this granite and brick structure was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1987 as Scituate Light.

Managed by the Scituate Historical Society, Scituate Light is currently active, flashes white every 15 seconds, and serves as a private aid to navigation. The grounds around the lighthouse are open year round, while the tower itself is open only during occasional open houses. Other buildings at this location include the 1811 keeper’s house.

A Pastel Sky and Canada Geese

I captured this image in early November at 4:17 pm. I loved how the setting sun was turning the sky into pastel shades of pink and blue. At the same time, I was graced by a flock of Canada geese flying by in a casually organized formation.

I was struck by the natural creation of a “Rule of Thirds” for the image — the blue, the pink, and the water horizontally; the geese and lighthouse vertically.

What photographer standing across Scituate Harbor could ask for more?

If you’re visiting Massachusetts’ south shore area, or simply love lighthouses, think about adding Scituate Light to your scenic travel list.

Photo Info:

Camera:  Nikon D300
Lens:  Nikkor 70-200mm
Exif Data:  1/250s, f/3.5, ISO 200, 120mm

For Licensing Information or to Purchase A Print:  Email Me!

Come back every week to see my latest “Single Shot Showcase”!

~ Liz Mackney

Website
Blog
Facebook Page
Editor’s Pick Gallery
Fine Art Prints

Proud Member of the New England Photography Guild 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: