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Mount Auburn Cemetery’s Beautiful Fall Foliage

October 14, 2013
Beautiful fall foliage at Mount Auburn Cemetery.

Mount Auburn Cemetery’s beautiful fall foliage

Peaceful and Colorful

While many folks in search of New England’s fall foliage head to places such as Acadia National Park in Maine, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, or the Green Mountains of Vermont, I’ve found beautiful fall foliage a bit closer to home and in a place not often thought of as a destination for leaf peeping.

As you can see for yourself, Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has an abundance of color to offer the foliage seeker. This tranquil setting is an idyllic place to explore — and to capture some autumn images that differ from the norm.

A Bit of History

Founded in 1831, Mount Auburn Cemetery is known as “America’s first garden cemetery” or “rural cemetery.” Situated on 174 acres of rolling landscape, the cemetery is noted for its historical aspects as well as its role as an arboretum.

Seasonal Beauty

One stroll through Mount Auburn Cemetery and you will quickly see why this is such an interesting and beautiful place. Come at this time of year, however, and you will also see that it is a colorful one as well!

Photo Info:

Camera:  Nikon D300
Lens:  Nikkor 18-200 mm
Exif Data:  ISO 200, 18mm, f/3.5, 1/1600 sec.

For Licensing Information or to Purchase A Print:  Email Me!

Come back every Monday to see my latest “Single Shot Showcase”!

~ Liz Mackney

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